First Fruits

As we reach the height of Summer, the gardens are beginning to yield:  flowers that we have anxiously watched turn to tiny green fruits are at last ripening, and it is the gardener’s delight to find those first fruits; whether it be a cucumber, green beans or summer squashes. The garden picture is finally complete!  It is very gratifying to see results of this labor of love that we call gardening.

That first Cucumber!

That first Cucumber!

In conversations with home gardeners, I have noticed a tendency among the novice to feel reluctant to harvest these first-comers, for they look so beautiful and it’s fun to show them off to visitors.  Resist the temptation to dwell upon this image, and go ahead and pick those first fruits!  What many folks don’t realize is that these first to ripen are merely a bit of a test for the plant, a “feeler” if you will:  How quickly the plant finds itself parted with its first offering is indication of “demand”, thus influencing “supply”.  Simple Economics.  If the first fruits of a plant are allowed to go to maturity and set seed, the plants gets the message to slow down growth, that it has accomplished its mission to reproduce and there is no need to produce very many more fruit.  If those first ones are picked, the plant kicks into production mode and begins to send out several more.

So, to get more beans, cukes or squash, it is important to go through and collect the first ones that appear.  You’ll get the double gratification of enjoying what you have grown and watching many more to come.

So pick all you want!  They’ll make more. 😉

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